Annealing

Full annealing is the process of slowly raising the temperature about 50 Deg C (122 Deg F) above the Austenitic temperature line A3 or line ACM in the case of Hypoeutectoid steels (steels with 0.77% Carbon).annealing1sm

It is held at this temperature for sufficient time for all the material to transform into Austenite or Austenite-Cementite as the case may be. It is then slowly cooled at the rate of about 20 Deg C/hr (60 Deg F/hr) in a furnace to about 50 Deg C (122 Deg F) into the Ferrite-Cementite range. At this point, it can be cooled in room temperature air with natural convection.

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The grain structure has coarse Pearlite with ferrite or Cementite (depending on whether hypo or hyper eutectoid). The steel becomes soft and ductile.

Normalizing

Normalizing is the process of raising the temperature to over 60 Deg C (140 Deg F), above line A3 or line ACM fully into the Austenite range. It is held at this temperature to fully convert the structure into Austenite, and then removed form the furnace and cooled at room temperature under natural convection. This results in a grain structure of fine Pearlite with excess of Ferrite or Cementite. The resulting material is soft; the degree of softness depends on the actual ambient conditions of cooling. This process is considerably cheaper than full annealing since there is not the added cost of controlled furnace cooling.

The main difference between full annealing and normalizing is that fully annealed parts are uniform in softness (and machinablilty) throughout the entire part; since the entire part is exposed to the controlled furnace cooling. In the case of the normalized part, depending on the part geometry, the cooling is non-uniform resulting in non-uniform material properties across the part. This may not be desirable if further machining is desired, since it makes the machining job somewhat unpredictable. In such a case it is better to do full annealing.

Process Annealing

Process Annealing is used to treat work-hardened parts made out of low-Carbon steels (< 0.25% Carbon). This allows the parts to be soft enough to undergo further cold working without fracturing. Process annealing is done by raising the temperature to just below the Ferrite-Austenite region, line A1 on the diagram. This temperature is about 727 Deg C (1341 Deg F) so heating it to about 700 Deg C (1292 Deg F) should suffice. This is held long enough to allow recrystallization of the ferrite phase, and then cooled in still air. Since the material stays in the same phase through out the process, the only change that occurs is the size, shape and distribution of the grain structure. This process is cheaper than either full annealing or normalizing since the material is not heated to a very high temperature or cooled in a furnace.

Stress Relief Annealing

Stress Relief Annealing is used to reduce residual stresses in large castings, welded parts and cold-formed parts. Such parts tend to have stresses due to thermal cycling or work hardening. Parts are heated to temperatures of upto 600 – 650 Deg C (1112 – 1202 Deg F), and held for an extended time (about 1 hour or more) and then slowly cooled in still air.

Spheroidization

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Spheroidization is an annealing process used for high carbon steels (Carbon > 0.6%) that will be machined or cold formed subsequently. This is done by one of the following ways:

  • Heat the part to a temperature just below the Ferrite-Austenite line, line A1 or below the Austenite-Cementite line, essentially below the 727 Deg C (1340 Deg F) line. Hold the temperature for a prolonged time and follow by fairly slow cooling.
  • Cycle multiple times between temperatures slightly above and slightly below the 727 Deg C (1340 Deg F) line, say for example between 700 and 750 Deg C (1292 – 1382 Deg F), and slow cool.
  • For tool and alloy steels heat to 750 to 800 Deg C (1382-1472 Deg F) and hold for several hours followed by slow cooling.

All these methods result in a structure in which all the Cementite is in the form of small globules (spheroids) dispersed throughout the ferrite matrix. This structure allows for improved machining in continuous cutting operations such as lathes and screw machines. Spheroidization also improves resistance to abrasion.

 

Sinotech offers an exceptionally wide range of secondary processes that are applied to metals formed in hot or cold processes. Sinotech’ Supplier Quality Engineers determine the availability of the process within the metal forming facility, as well as the quality. If the internal secondary processes do not meet Sinotech standards then the processes are carried out in Sinotech-audited and qualified off-site secondary processing facilities. Sinotech has audited, qualified and worked with QS-9000 and ISO certified secondary processing facilities in China, Taiwan and Korea for over 12 years. Sinotech is dedicated to managing your project on-site and delivering parts to you at lower prices but the same quality, service and terms as a domestic supplier.

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